Human Trafficking Resources




Human Trafficking is defined as ‘the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of forcefraud or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage or slavery; or sex trafficking in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such an act has not attained 18 years of age.’

– source: Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000



Fast Facts
  • Human trafficking earns illegal profits of $150 billion annually. Two-thirds are generated from commercial sexual exploitation and a third are the result of forced labor.
  • Human trafficking is one of the fastest growing illegal criminal industries in the world. It is second to illegal drugs and tied with illegal arms dealing. Due to the low risk and high profit potential of trafficking human beings, criminal organizations and individuals are attracted to this lucrative industry, where a human can be sold continuously.
  • Human trafficking occurs all over the world. According to the UNODC, the Americas are prominent as both the source and destination place for victims of human trafficking.
  • Human trafficking occurs in all 50 states, including our capitol, Washington, D.C. Since 2007, the National Human Trafficking Hotline (NHTH) hotline received 31,659 reports of human trafficking cases from all 50 states. California has remained the highest reported state since 2012.
  • Sex trafficking is the most rampant form of human trafficking in the United States. As of December 31, 2016, the NHTRC hotline received 5,551 sex trafficking related cases out of the 7,572 human trafficking cases reported.
  • The average age a victim is trafficked in Las Vegas is 15-16 years old. The youngest commercially sexually exploited child recovered from LVMPD in 2016 was 12 years old.
  • The most prevalent trend for sex trafficking in Las Vegas is the “Romeo” pimp or “boyfriend scenario.”

REFRAME THE NARRATIVE

CHILD/TEEN PROSTITUTE
  • Used as an insult/derogatory term.
  • Provides no context for the “choices” made.
  • A young person who has made a conscious and poor choice to enter the commercial sex industry.
  • Wrongly equated with a “profession” or work.
  • Punishable – youth deserve consequences of sexual violence, social isolation, incarceration, etc.
  • Denies social responsibility and accountability to address as an issue.
CSEC - COMMERCIALLY SEXUALLY EXPLOITED CHILD
  • A young person who has been sexually used, coerced, manipulated,, and violently controlled for another person’s profit.
  • Indicates that multiple factors impact how and why children are involved.
  • A child not developmentally, legally, or socially able to make the “choice” to have sex for money or to become involved in the commercial sex industry.
  • Defines what has happened to a child, rather than labels who the child is.
  • A young person victimized by multiple systems of oppression.
  • Calls for social responsibility and accountability to address as an issue.

You may choose to look the other way, but you can never say again that you did not know.

William Wilberforce Abolitionist


Statistics

OF THE 21 MILLION FORCED LABOR VICTIMS

  • WOMEN & GIRLS: 11.4 MILLION
  • MEN & BOYS: 9.5 MILLION

FORCED LABOR IN PRIVATE ECONOMY GENERATES


$150
billion in profits annually

The Asia-Pacific region constitutes the largest number of forced labor in the world.


typology of forced labor

  • PRIVATE INDIVIDUALS/ENTERPRISES: 19 MILLION
  • STATE/REBEL GROUPS: 2 MILLION

OF THE 19 MILLION EXPLOITED BY PRIVATE INDIVIDUALS/ENTERPRISES

  • VICTIMS OF FORCED SEXUAL EXPLOITATION: 4.5 MILLION
  • VICTIMS OF FORCED LABOR EXPLOITATION: 14.2 MILLION

``Three out of every 1,000 people worldwide are victims of forced labor.``


VICTIMS OF FORCED LABOR BY REGION


Asia-Pacific Region - 56% (11.7 million)
Africa - 18% (3.7 million)
Latin America - 9% (1.8 million)
Developed Economies & European Union - 7% (1.5 million)
Central & South-eastern European countries & Commonwealth of Independent States - 7% (1.6 million)
Middle East - 3% (600,000)

NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING RESOURCE CENTER STATS

*current as of March 31, 2016


25791
human trafficking cases since 2007

1654
human trafficking cases reported this year

6051
calls this year

1220
sex trafficking cases


200
labor trafficking cases


166
unspecified trafficking cases


68
sex & labor trafficking cases


TOP VENUESLABOR TRAFFICKING

  • Domestic Work
  • Traveling Sales Crews
  • Restaurant/Food Service
  • Agriculture
  • Health & Beauty Services

TOP VENUESSEX TRAFFICKING

  • Hostess/Strip-Club
  • Commercial Front Brothels
  • Online Ad
  • Residential Brothels
  • Street-Based

NEVADA STATE REPORT VIA THE NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING HOTLINE (2016)

*The National Human Trafficking Hotline received 243 calls from Nevada with 161 of them turning out to be substantive human trafficking cases, constituting the 11th highest number of cases received out of all 50 states & Washington, D.C. 


243
PHONE CALLS
161
cases

CALLER TYPE


TOP 4 CALLERS


61
Victims of Trafficking
58
Community Members
22
Family of Trafficking Victim
20
NGO Representatives

HOW CALLER FOUND THE HOTLINE


TOP 3 WAYS


9
Web Searches
9
Word of Mouth
8
DHS Blue Campaign

ADDITIONAL WAYS


4
Referral
2
Billboard

PRIMARY REASON FOR CONTACTING THE HOTLINE

*In Nevada, a total of 161 cases (incidents) of potential human trafficking were reported to the Hotline in 2016.

110
reported a trafficking tip
32
accessed service referrals
19
requested crisis assistance

VENUE/INDUSTRY FOR SEX TRAFFICKING


TOP 3 VENUES


21
Hotel/Motel-Based
13
Online Ad*
10
Street-Based

ADDITIONAL VENUES


10
Escort Services
6
Residential Brothels

VENUE/INDUSTRY FOR LABOR TRAFFICKING


3
DOMESTIC WORK
8
INDUSTRIES REFERENCED IN FEWER THAN 3 CASES**

OTHER TYPES OF CASES


10
SEX & LABOR
8
TRAFFICKING TYPE NOT SPECIFIED***

*An individual is advertised for commercial sex online, but the venue of the sex act is unknown or unspecified.

**To protect the identity of the people NHTRC serves, the NHTRC does not disclose exact statistics related to venues, industries, victim information or caller information referenced fewer than three times.

***This typically occurs when a law enforcement agent or service provider contacts the NHTRC for resources and referrals but does not disclose details about the trafficking situation due to confidentiality. This category also includes cases in which the person reporting the information references human trafficking but does not provide further detail regarding the presence of labor or commercial sex. These cases are often submitted to the NHTRC through anonymous online tip reports.

VICTIM DEMOGRAPHICS


GENDER


142
FEMALES
12
MALE
6
GENDER MINORITIES

AGE


124
ADULTS
50
MINORS

CITIZENSHIP

62
U.S. CITIZENS/LPR
17
FOREIGN NATIONALS

LOCATION OF TRAFFICKING IN NEVADA


2016 - COMMERCIALLY SEXUALLY EXPLOITED CHILDREN*

*of the 140 commercially sexually exploited children in 2016

between the ages of 16 and 18

reported as prior runaways

were local children



2
boys recovered


138
girls recovered


15
were 14 years of age or younger


50
children recovered in the strip corridor


ETHNIC DEMOGRAPHICS


Asian - 4%
Caucasian - 10%
Latin American - 13%
African American - 76%

  • From 1994 through 2016, over 2,794 minors (federally defined as individuals under 18 yrs. old) have been recovered from human sex trafficking by the Las Vegas Metro Police Department (LVMPD).
  • Over half of the juvenile victims did not have a missing person’s report in the national systems. (src: ASU, “2014 Las Vegas Sex Trafficking Study”)
  • According to research from a shelter in Nevada, family members exploited 30% of domestically trafficked youth who were seeking services from the respective shelter.
  • There is a significant correlation between those who were sexually exploited and also victims of sexual assault, physical abuse or family molestation.
  • Many of the commercially sexually exploited children victims were also prior runaways .

*prepared by LVMPD-SNHTTF 2016

2016 - ADULT VICTIMS OF SEX TRAFFICKING*

*of 121 adult victims recovered in 2016

are female

cases were investigated involving adult victims

between the ages of 18 and 23



588
adult victims recovered since 2011


337
adult victims recovered in 2014-2016


119
female victims recovered


2
male victims recovered


ETHNIC DEMOGRAPHICS


Asian - 5%
Latin American - 12%
African America - 43%
Caucasian - 44%




*prepared by LVMPD-SNHTTF 2016



REPORT A TIP

1-888-3737-888

If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, call 911.  For help, resources or to report an anonymous tip, call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center Hotline at 1-888-3737-888 or text 233733 (BEFREE) with “HELP” or “INFO.”


Signs/Red Flags

Work & Living Conditions

  • Not free to come and go as they please.
  • Living at the workplace or with the employer.
  • Living with multiple people in a cramped space.
  • Works excessively long and/or unusual hours.
  • Not allowed breaks or suffers under unusual restrictions at work.
  • Owes a large debt and is unable to pay it off.
  • Fines or fees were added to debt bondage.
  • Was recruited through false promises concerning the nature and conditions of his/her work.
  • High security measures exist (e.g. bars on windows, escorted everywhere they go, etc.)
  • Attending school sporadically, not at all, or has a significant gap of schooling.
  • Traffickers are sometimes family members.
  • Conditioned to refer to traffickers by familial titles (e.g. uncle, cousin, aunt, etc.)

Behavior

  • Fearful, anxious, depressed, submissive, tense, or nervous/paranoid.
  • Display feelings of shame, helplessness, humiliation, shock, denial, and disbelief.
  • Disoriented and confused.
  • Exhibit phobias and/or frequent occurrence of panic attacks.
  • Avoids eye contact.

Physical Health

  • Lacks medical care and/or denied medical services by employer.
  • Malnourished or often hungry.
  • Poorly formed or rotting teeth.
  • Signs of physical and/or sexual abuse, physical restraint, confinement, or torture.
  • Chronic back, hearing, cardiovascular, or respiratory problems.

Lack of Control

  • Not in control of own identification documents.
  • Has few or no personal possessions.
  • Not in control of own money.
  • Not allowed to speak for themselves – a third party may insist on being present and/or translating.

Other

  • Lost sense of time.
  • Lack of knowledge of whereabouts.
  • Claims just visiting and unable to clarify where they are staying.
  • Has numerous inconsistencies in story and/or story sounds rehearsed.
  • Have limited or no contact with family.
  • In possession of fraudulent paperwork.
  • Have an expired temporary visa.

Possible Settings

  • Agricultural Farm
  • Restaurant
  • Hotel/Motel
  • Residential Home
  • Car Wash
  • Beauty Salon
  • Sweatshop
  • Elderly Care Facility

Work & Living Conditions

  • Not free to come and go as they please.
  • In the commercial sex industry and has a pimp/manager.
  • Living at the workplace or with the employer.
  • Living with multiple people in a cramped space.
  • Traffickers are sometimes family members.
  • Conditioned to refer to traffickers by familial titles (e.g. uncle, cousin, daddy, etc.)
  • High security measures exist (e.g. bars on windows, escorted everywhere, etc.)

Youth specific:

  • Attends school sporadically, not at all, or has a significant gap of schooling.
  • Comes home late or past curfew for unexplained reasons.
  • Chronically runs away from home.
  • Grades drop.

Behavior

  • Fearful, anxious, depressed, submissive, tense, or nervous/paranoid.
  • Display feelings of shame, helplessness, humiliation, shock, denial, and disbelief.
  • Disoriented and confused.
  • Exhibit phobias and/or suffer from panic attacks.
  • Avoids eye contact.

Youth Specific:

  • Youth is defensive, secretive, or defiant when confronted.
  • Youth is in a relationship with an adult boyfriend.
  • Has a strong obsession with adult boyfriend.
  • Youth is afraid of consequences of not meeting boyfriend’s demands or expectations.
  • High levels of secrecy.
  • Youth is exhausted at odd times.
  • Has a sudden change in attire.
  • Makes sexual references beyond age-specific norms.

Physical Health

  • Lacks medical care and/or denied medical services by employer.
  • Malnourished or often hungry.
  • Poorly formed or rotting teeth.
  • Signs of physical and/or sexual abuse, physical restraint, confinement, or torture.
  • Has a new visible tattoo – a form of “branding.”
  • Pelvic pain, rectal trauma, urinary difficulties.
  • Chronic back, hearing, cardiovascular or respiratory problems.
  • Reproductive problems.

Common Co-Occurrences

  • Domestic Violence
  • Child Abuse & Neglect
  • HIV
  • STIs
  • Unwanted Pregnancies/Unwanted Abortions
  • Unmet Preventative Healthcare Needs
  • Drug & Alcohol Abuse & Addiction

Degree of Trauma

  • High rates of PTSD
  • Stockholm Syndrome: emotional bonding with captor or abuser
  • Memory Loss
  • Aggression, fear, depression, anxiety, hostility, and/or anger issues
  • High occurrences of STDs/STIs
  • Physical trauma from beatings
  • Emotional and psychological truama
  • Sleeping and eating disorders

Lack of Control

  • Has few or no personal possessions.
  • Not in control of own money.
  • Not in control of own identification documents.
  • Not allowed or able to speak for themselves.

Other

  • Lost sense of time.
  • Lack of knowledge of whereabouts.
  • Has numerous inconsistencies in story or story sounds rehearsed.

Youth Specific:

  • Has designer or expensive items from boyfriend.
  • Hair and nails are always done.
  • Boyfriend controls youth’s appearance and/or social life.
  • Boyfriend constantly checks up on youth.
  • Youth suddenly has a different social group.
  • Youth uses new language.
  • Carries multiple cell phones.

Possible Settings

  • Hotel/Motel
  • On the Street
  • Massage Parlor
  • Residential Home
  • Strip Club
  • Escort Service
  • Brothel
  • Modeling Agency
  • Internet
  • Chiropractic Office

Youth Specific:

  • School
  • Internet
  • Hotel/Motel
  • Residential Home
  • Bus Stops
  • Group Homes
  • Foster Homes
  • Shelters
  • On the Street
  • Parties

Trafficking is a form of torture.

Dr. Halleh Forensic Traumatologist, ARMAN


Legislation
CONVENTION AGAINST TRANSNATIONAL ORGANIZED CRIME (aka THE PALERMO PROTOCOL)

A trilateral treaty adopted by the United Nations in 2000 that contains the protocol to prevent, suppress, and punish trafficking in persons, especially women and children (see below).  The convention and protocol fall under the jurisdiction of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

THE PROTOCOL TO PREVENT, SUPPRESS, & PUNISH TRAFFICKING IN PERSON, ESP. WOMEN & CHILDREN (aka ``TRAFFICKING PROTOCOL)

Adopted by the United Nations in 2000, this protocol is supplements the U.N. Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime with the purpose to: prevent and combat trafficking in persons, with special regard for women and children; protect and assist victims of human trafficking; and promote cooperation and partnership among the States involved.  READ THE PROTOCOL

TRAFFICKING VICTIMS PROTECTION ACT (TVPA)

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) was passed by the U.S. Congress in 2000 to comprehensively address human trafficking as a crime, with a notable emphasis on the international scope of the issue, and an approach to adopt legislation and policies for the prosecution of traffickers, the protection of victims, and the prevention of trafficking.  It has been reauthorized in 2003, 2005, 2008, and 2013.

EXECUTIVE ORDER STRENGTHENING PROTECTIONS IN FEDERAL CONTRACTS

An executive order signed by President Obama in 2012 directing the Federal Acquisition Regulatory (FAR) Council to amend federal contracting regulations to: prohibit contractors and subcontractors from engaging in specific trafficking-related activities; apply new, tailored compliance measures for larger contracts performed abroad; and also establishes a process to identify industries and sectors that have a history of human trafficking, to enhance compliance on domestic contracts; and augments training and heightens agencies’ ability to detect and address trafficking violations. READ FACT SHEET

THE MANN ACT (1910)

The Federal Mann Act of 1910 was originally enacted to “further regulate interstate commerce and foreign commerce by prohibiting the transportation therein for immoral purposes of women and girls, and for other purposes.”  It also criminalizes a person who persuades, induces, entices or coerces an individual to travel across state lines to engage in prostitution or other immoral purposes, or attempts to do so.

The Mann Act has been amended in 1978, 1986 and 1994 to continually address Congress’ concern for the sexual exploitation of minors. READ THE ORIGINAL ACT IN FULL

THE TARIFF ACT OF 1930

Section 307 of the Tariff Act of 1930 prohibits importing goods mined, produced, or manufactured made with forced, child, or indentured labor.  However,  a loophole enabled the importation of such goods into America when the demand for aforementioned goods exceeded our domestic supply and production of such.

THE PROTECT ACT (2003)

The PROTECT Act stands for the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to End the Exploitation of Children Today which was enacted in 2003 to combat the sexual exploitation of children. It requires courts to impose mandatory sentences for sex offenders and makes it a crime to engage in sex tourism, which is traveling abroad with the intention of engaging in sexual conduct with minors.  It also allowed for states to expand their Amber Alert systems for missing, exploited, and abducted children, imposed increased heavy penalties for perpetrators and strengthened laws against child pornography.

THE TRADE FACILITATION AND TRADE ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 2015

The Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015  prohibits the importation of goods made with forced or indentured labor closing the loophole of the Tariff Act of 1930, among other requirements on trade protection and trade policy.

THE RACKETEERING INFLUENCED CORRUPT ORGANIZATIONS ACT (RICO)

RICO is a federal law that allows members of organized crime to be prosecuted for criminal offenses with specific focus on that of racketeering, an offense which can be prosecuted as a human trafficking offense by the federal government.

Human Trafficking of Minors & Adults

Human trafficking was not recognized as a crime in Nevada until 2013 with the passing of AB 67.  Prior to AB 67, Nevada had a pandering law, which was a broad and antiquated piece of legislation with penalties of only up to four years of imprisonment.

AB 67 - Human Trafficking Law

  • Authorizes victims of human trafficking to bring a civil action.
  • Amends various provisions concerning the investigation and prosecution of sex trafficking, involuntary servitude and trafficking in persons, including wiretapping.
  • Amends various provisions concerning the crimes of pandering, sex trafficking, involuntary servitude and trafficking in persons.
  • Revising various provisions governing penalties for pandering, sex trafficking, involuntary servitude and trafficking in persons.
  • Requires a person convicted of sex trafficking to register as a sex offender.
  • Amends various provisions relating to victims of sex trafficking.
  • Revises provisions relating to the powers and duties of the Advocate for Missing or Exploited Children.
  • Provides harsh penalties.  Penalties include:
    • Adult Victims: 3-10 years prison & $10,000 fine
    • Child Victims (under 18): Maximum penalty is LIFE in prison w/ possibility of parole; varies by age of victims:
      • >14 years old: minimum of 15 years served;
      • 14-16 years old: minimum of 10 years served;
      • 16-18 years old: minimum of 5 years served.

*src: NV Legislature, 77th Session, 2013, AB 67

AB 49 - Expert Testimony

Revises provisions on governing crimes.  Sets forth provisions relating to expert testimony in a prosecution for pandering or sex trafficking.

*src: NV Legislature, 78th Session, 2015, AB 49


Sex Trafficking of Minors

AB 8 - Custody of Children Against Trafficking

Section 4 of this bill enacts provisions prohibiting the trafficking of children. Section 4 provides that a person shall not recruit, transport, transfer, harbor, provide, obtain, maintain or solicit a child in furtherance of a transaction, or advertise or facilitate a transaction, pursuant to which a parent of a child or a person with custody of a child places the child in the physical custody of another person who is not related to the child, for the purpose of permanently avoiding or divesting himself or herself of responsibility for the child. Section 4 further provides that certain placements of a child are not prohibited, including, without limitation, the placement of a child with a relative or stepparent, the placement of a child with or by a licensed child-placing agency or agency which provides child welfare services and the placement of a child with a person that is approved by a court of competent jurisdiction. A person who violates section 4 is guilty of a category C felony, and section 5 of this bill requires a court to order that a person convicted of a violation of section 4 pay restitution to the victim of the crime.

*src: NV Legislature, 78th Session, 2015, AB 8

AB 153 - Safe Harbor Bill

A sexually exploited child is placed under the supervision of the juvenile court under certain terms and conditions.

These terms and conditions include two important components:

  1. Provision of Services for victims
  2. Legal Protection. Our particular Safe Harbor Bill establishes a diversion program where the charges against the child are dismissed if the child completes the program or turns 18, whichever comes first.  

In addition, the child who has reached 18 years of age may consent to remain under the supervision of the juvenile court for the purpose of receiving services pursuant to the decree.

*src: NV Legislature, 78th Session, 2015, AB 153

AB 214 - Soliciting a Child

Revises provisions relating to penalties for soliciting a child for prostitution, increasing the penalty for each subsequent level of offense from E to B to A, respectively, with the inclusion of mandatory fines.

*src: NV Legislature, 78th Session, 2015, AB 214

AB 260 - Engaging in Solicitation for Prostitution

  •  Increases the penalty for engaging in solicitation for prostitution; If found guilty for a first offense (misdemeanor) a mandatory fine of not less than $400; second offense guilty is gross misdemeanor and mandatory fee of not less than $800; third is gross misdemeanor and mandatory fine of not less than $1,300.
  •  Requires court to impose a civil penalty on a person found guilty of such offense, collected for 1) enforcing certain crimes related to solicitation of prostitution and 2) programs of treatment for persons who solicit prostitution
  •  Bill requires 1) the appointment by the Attorney General of a Committee on Prostitution and Human Trafficking tasked with adopting regulations for the evaluation, certification and monitoring of programs for the treatment of persons who solicit prostitution; review, monitor and certify programs for the treatment of persons who solicit prostitution; review and evaluate programs provided to peace officers for training related to prostitution and sex trafficking and make recommendations to the Peace Officers’ Standard and Training Commission regarding such training; arrange for the provision of legal services; submit on or before March 1 of each odd-numbered year a report to the Director of the Legislative Counsel Bureau for distribution to the regular session of the Legislature, which includes a summary of the work of the Committee and recommendations for any necessary legislation concerning prostitution or sex trafficking.
  •  The bill also authorizes a justice of the peace or municipal judge to suspend sentence of a person who is convicted of a misdemeanor that constitutes solicitation for prostitution on the condition that the person actively participates in a program for the treatment of persons who solicit prostitution.

*src: NV Legislature, 79th Session, 2017, AB 260

AB 380 - Various Changes Relating to Sexual Exploitation of Child

Providing for the freezing and forfeiture of the assets of a person who commits certain offenses involving the pandering or prostitution of a child; authorizing a court to impose an additional criminal fine on a person convicted of certain offenses involving the pandering or prostitution of a child.

*src: NV Legislature, 75th Session, 2009, AB 380

SB 488 - Guilty of Sex Trafficking

Expands the Nevada human trafficking laws to include those that facilitate, transport, or advertise victims are guilty of human trafficking. Additionally, it creates a Medicaid package for survivors and requires reporting back to the Governor’s CSEC Coalition.

  • provides that a person is also guilty of sex trafficking if he/she 1) facilitates, arranges, provides or pays for the transportation of a person to or within this state to cause that person to engage in unlawful sexual conduct or prostitution, or if that person is a child, certain acts relating to pornography involving minors; 2) advertises, sells or offers to sell travel services that include or facilitate such travel; 3)travels, attempts to travel or knowingly causes another person to travel/attempt to within this state by any means for the purpose of engaging in sexual conduct with a victim of sex trafficking or certain acts relating to pornography involving minors.
  • increases eligibility for parole from 15 years to 20 years for a person who is found guilty of sex trafficking a child less than 14.
  • Requires the Department of Health and Human Services to develop a Medicaid service package (Sexual Trauma Services Guide) to assist victims of sexual trauma who are eligible for Medicaid.
  • Requires the Department to post information about the guide on the Internet site of the Department and make it available upon request. Authorizes the Department to adopt regulations relating to the development of the guide.
  • Requires the Department to hold periodic informational meetings to coordinate efforts of various entities to improve services for victims of sex trafficking and achieve goals set forth in statewide strategic plan developed by the Coalition.

*src: NV Legislature, 79th Session, 2017, SB 488


Labor Trafficking of Minors

AB 146 - Servitude of a Minor

Establishes the crime of involuntary servitude of a minor; providing a penalty.

*src: NV Legislature, 77th Session, 2013, AB 146


Victim Centered Legislation

AB 6 - Vacated Convictions for Certain Victims of Trafficking

Authorizes courts to allow certain victims of sex trafficking or involuntary servitude who have been convicted of engaging in or soliciting prostitution to have their judgments of convictions vacated.

*src: NV Legislature, 76th Session, 2011, AB 6

AB 108 - Judgments Vacated

Authorizes courts to allow certain victims of sex and/or labor trafficking who have been convicted of “certain crimes” to have their judgments of conviction vacated. 

*src: NV Legislature, 78th Session, 2015, AB 108

AB 311 - Contingency Account for Human Trafficking Victims

Creates the Contingency Account for Victims of Human Trafficking in the State General Fund; authorizing the Director of Department of Health and Human Services to allocate money from the Account to nonprofit corporations and agencies and political subdivisions of this State for the purposes of establishing or providing programs and services to victims of human trafficking.

*src: NV Legislature, 77th Session, 2013, AB 311

Tier 1: Polaris Project (2014)

Polaris Project, a Washington, D.C. based organization that runs the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline, “has rated all 50 states and the District of Columbia, since 2011,  based on 10 categories of laws that are critical to a basic legal framework that combats human trafficking, punishes traffickers, and support survivors.”

Nevada was ranked as a Tier 1 state in 2014, who had existing laws that dealt with sex trafficking, labor trafficking, asset forfeiture, investigative tools, training for law enforcement, no requirement of force, fraud or coercion for minor victims of sex trafficking, victim assistance, civil remedy and vacating convictions.  At that time, we still needed laws that covered a human trafficking task force, posting of a hotline, and a safe harbor law for minors (which we eventually passed in 2015 via AB 153.)

The 10 categories of state statutes include:

  1. Sex Trafficking
  2. Labor Trafficking
  3. (a) Asset Forfeiture for Human Trafficking; (b) Investigative Tools for Law Enforcement
  4. (a) Training on Human Trafficking for Law Enforcement; (b) Human Trafficking Commission or Task Force
  5. Lower Burden of Proof for Sex Trafficking of Minors
  6. Posting a Human Trafficking Hotline
  7. Safe Harbor – Protecting Sexually Exploited Minors
  8. Victim Assistance
  9. Access to Civil Damages
  10. Vacating Convictions for Sex Trafficking Victims


Grade B: Shared Hope International (2015)

Shared Hope International, a non-profit organization that advocates to combat human trafficking against minors, has conducted The Protected Innocence Challenge since 2011.  “The Protected Innocence Challenge is a comprehensive study of existing state laws designed to inspire and equip advocates.  Under the Challenge, every state receives a Report Card that grades the state on 41 key legislative components that must be addressed in state’s laws in order to effectively respond to the crime of domestic minor sex trafficking.  In addition, each state receives a complete analysis of this 41-component review and practical recommendations for improvement.”

For 2015, Nevada received a final score of 84 and a grade B.  A brief overview of the report card can be read here.



ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
This list is by no means exhaustive, but acts more like a catalyst to jump-start you on your film/doc journey. Binge on.

INTERNATIONAL

NEFARIOUS

NOT MY LIFE

THE WHISTLEBLOWER


SWEATSHOP


NATIONAL

CAGED NO MORE

IN PLAIN SIGHT

SEX + MONEY


LAS VEGAS/NEVADA

SURVIVING SIN CITY


SURVIVING SIN CITY ESPAÑOL


サバイビングシンシティ - SURVIVING SIN CITY JAPANESE


THE TRACK

TRAFFICKED NO MORE